Journal article

Prevalence of arthritis according to age, sex and socioeconomic status in six low and middle income countries: analysis of data from the World Health Organization study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1

Sharon L Brennan-Olsen, S Cook, MT Leech, SJ Bowe, P Kowal, N Naidoo, N Ackerman, RS Page, SM Hosking, JA Pasco, M Mohebbi

BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS | BIOMED CENTRAL LTD | Published : 2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In higher income countries, social disadvantage is associated with higher arthritis prevalence; however, less is known about arthritis prevalence or determinants in low to middle income countries (LMICs). We assessed arthritis prevalence by age and sex, and marital status and occupation, as two key parameters of socioeconomic position (SEP), using data from the World Health Organization Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE). METHODS: SAGE Wave 1 (2007-10) includes nationally-representative samples of older adults (≥50 yrs), plus smaller samples of adults aged 18-49 yrs., from China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia and South Africa (n = 44,747). Arthritis was defined by self..

View full abstract

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Career Development Fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by Division of Behavioral and Social Research (BSR) at the US National Institute on Aging (NIA)



Funding Acknowledgements

SLB-O is supported by a Career Development Fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (1107510). SAGE is supported by WHO and the Division of Behavioral and Social Research (BSR) at the US National Institute on Aging (NIA) through Interagency Agreements (OGHA 04034785; YA1323-08-CN-0020; Y1-AG-1005-01) with WHO and a Research Project Grant R01AG034479. In addition, the governments of China and South Africa provided financial or other support for Wave 1 of their national studies. USAID provided additional funds in support of SAGE India to increase the sample of women aged 15-49 years as a nested study examining health in younger women. All collaborating institutions provided substantial resources to conduct the studies.