Journal article

Impact of hypoglycaemia on patient-reported outcomes from a global, 24-country study of 27,585 people with type 1 and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes.

Kamlesh Khunti, Saud Alsifri, Ronnie Aronson, Maja Cigrovski Berković, Catherine Enters-Weijnen, Tom Forsén, Gagik Galstyan, Petronella Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, Margalit Goldfracht, Helge Gydesen, Rahul Kapur, Nebojsa Lalic, Bernhard Ludvik, Erik Moberg, Ulrik Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ambady Ramachandran, undefined HAT Investigator Group

Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice | Published : 2017

Abstract

AIMS: Data on the impact of hypoglycaemia on patients' daily lives and diabetes self-management, particularly in developing countries, are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess fear of, and responses to, hypoglycaemia experienced by patients globally. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This non-interventional, multicentre, 4-week prospective study using self-assessment questionnaires and patient diaries consisted of 27,585 patients, ≥18years, with type 1 diabetes (n=8022) or type 2 diabetes (n=19,563) treated with insulin for >12months, at 2004 sites in 24 countries worldwide. RESULTS: Increased blood glucose monitoring (69.7%) and seeking medical assistance (62.0%) were the most common responses..

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University of Melbourne Researchers