Journal article

Human Influenza Is More Effective than Avian Influenza at Antiviral Suppression in Airway Cells

Alan Chen-Yu Hsu, Ian Barr, Philip M Hansbro, Peter A Wark

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY | AMER THORACIC SOC | Published : 2011

Abstract

Airway epithelial cells are the initial site of infection with influenza viruses. The innate immune responses of airway epithelial cells to infection are important in limiting virus replication and spread. However, relatively little is known about the importance of this innate antiviral response to infection. Avian influenza viruses are a potential source of future pandemics; therefore, it is critical to examine the effectiveness of the host antiviral system to different influenza viruses. We used a human influenza (H3N2) and a low-pathogenic avian influenza (H11N9) to assess and compare the antiviral responses of Calu-3 cells. After infection, H3N2 replicated more effectively than the H11N9..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by National Health and Medical Research Council grants 510762 and 401314.P.A.W. has served on the board for Astra Zeneca ($ 1,001-$ 5,000), has received lecture fees from Astra Zeneca ($ 1,001-$ 5,000) and GlaxoSmithKline ($ 1,001-$ 5,000), and has received industry-sponsored grants from GlaxoSmithKline ($ 10,001-$ 50,000); none of the other authors has a financial relationship with a commercial entity that has an interest in the subject of this manuscript.