Journal article

Trends in PIEDs use among male clients of needle-syringe programs in Queensland, Australia; 2007-2015

B Jacka, A Peacock, L Degenhardt, R Bruno, P Clare, R Kemp, A Dev, B Larance

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DRUG POLICY | ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV | Published : 2017

Abstract

Background Increased utilisation of needle–syringe programs (NSP) by men who inject performance and image-enhancing drugs (PIEDs) has been reported. While fewer in number, people who inject PIEDs possess distinct service and knowledge needs compared to other NSP clients. Methods Using standardised data from 26 NSP outlets through the Queensland NSP Minimum Data Set (QNSPMDS), trends in occasions of services among males intending to inject PIEDs were assessed using multilevel mixed-effects negative binomial regression, adjusting for month, year, and age, and clustering by site. Results Compared to 2007, PIEDs-related occasions of service increased from 2008 until 2013 (3% and 13% of all occas..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was funded by the Australian Government Department of Health. BL LD, and AP are supported by NHMRC research fellowships (APP1041472,APP1073858, APP1109366). The National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre at UNSW Australia is supported by funding from the Australian Government under the Substance Misuse Prevention and Service Improvements Grant Fund.The authors thank the study participants for their contribution to the research, current and past researchers and staff, with particular thanks to Andrew Smirnov (Queensland Alcohol and Drug Research and Education Centre, School of Public Health Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland) and Oluwadamisola Sotade (National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, UNSW Medicine, UNSW Sydney). This research was funded by the Australian Government Department of Health. BL and LD are supported by NHMRC research fellowships (#1041472, #1073858). The National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre at UNSW Australia is supported by funding from the Australian Government under the Substance Misuse Prevention and Service Improvements Grant Fund.