Journal article

Effects of Acute Progesterone Administration Upon Responses to Acute Psychosocial Stress in Men

Emma Childs, Nicholas T Van Dam, Harriet de Wit

EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY | AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC | Published : 2010

Abstract

Animal studies suggest that neuroactive steroids, in particular progesterone and its metabolites, have stress-dampening effects. However, few studies have explored these effects in humans. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute progesterone administration on responses to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Healthy men participated in the TSST 3.5 hrs after intramuscular injection of 0, 50, or 100 mg progesterone (N = 16, 14, and 14). We measured cardiovascular (heart rate, blood pressure), hormonal (plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone, cortisol, and noradrenaline), and subjective (e.g., anxiety, arousal) responses to stress in the three groups. Before the TSST, progesterone inj..

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Grants

Awarded by NIDA


Awarded by University of Chicago Hospital's GCRC (USPHS)


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE


Funding Acknowledgements

These experiments complied with current U.S. laws. The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest. This research was supported by NIDA (DA02812) and the University of Chicago Hospital's GCRC (USPHS MO1RR000555); the NIDA and University of Chicago Hospital's GCRC had no further role in study design; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; and in the decision to submit the paper for publication. We thank Leslie Sidney and Joshua Shulruff for their technical assistance.