Journal article

A mechanistic model quantifies artemisinin-induced parasite growth retardation in blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum infection

Pengxing Cao, Nectarios Klonis, Sophie Zaloumis, David S Khoury, Deborah Cromer, Miles P Davenport, Leann Tilley, Julie A Simpson, James M McCaw

JOURNAL OF THEORETICAL BIOLOGY | ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2017

Abstract

Falciparum malaria is a major parasitic disease causing widespread morbidity and mortality globally. Artemisinin derivatives-the most effective and widely-used antimalarials that have helped reduce the burden of malaria by 60% in some areas over the past decade-have recently been found to induce growth retardation of blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum when applied at clinically relevant concentrations. To date, no model has been designed to quantify the growth retardation effect and to predict the influence of this property on in vivo parasite killing. Here we introduce a mechanistic model of parasite growth from the ring to trophozoite stage of the parasite's life cycle, and by modelling the..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Centre for Research Excellence ViCBiostat


Awarded by Centre for Research Excellence PRISM2


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

The work was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia [grant numbers 1100394, 1060357]; the Centre for Research Excellence ViCBiostat [grant number 1035261]; and the Centre for Research Excellence PRISM2 [grant number 1078068]. James M. McCaw was supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship [grant number FT110100250]. Julie A. Simpson was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Senior Research Fellowship [grant number 1104975]. Leann Tilley was supported by an Australian Research Council Professorial Fellowship [grant number FL150100106]. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.