Journal article

Bivariate genome-wide association meta-analysis of pediatric musculoskeletal traits reveals pleiotropic effects at the SREBF1/TOM1L2 locus

Carolina Medina-Gomez, John P Kemp, Niki L Dimou, Eskil Kreiner, Alessandra Chesi, Babette S Zemel, Klaus Bonnelykke, Cindy G Boer, Tarunveer S Ahluwalia, Hans Bisgaard, Evangelos Evangelou, Denise HM Heppe, Lynda F Bonewald, Jeffrey P Gorski, Mohsen Ghanbari, Serkalem Demissie, Gustavo Duque, Matthew T Maurano, Douglas P Kiel, Yi-Hsiang Hsu Show all

NATURE COMMUNICATIONS | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2017

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Wellcome Trust


Awarded by Medical Research Council


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by European Commission


Awarded by Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development


Awarded by National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)


Awarded by Clinical and Translational Research Center


Awarded by NIH (the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, ARRA)


Awarded by National institute on Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases


Funding Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the many colleagues who contributed to collection and phenotypic characterization of the clinical samples, as well as genotyping and analysis of the GWAS data. Full details of acknowledgements are provided below.ALSPAC Study: We are extremely grateful to all the families who took part in this study, the midwives for their help in recruiting them, and the whole ALSPAC team, which includes interviewers, computer and laboratory technicians, clerical workers, research scientists, volunteers, managers, receptionists, and nurses. GWAS data was generated by Sample Logistics and Genotyping Facilities at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and LabCorp (Laboratory Corporation of America) using support from 23andMe. The UK Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust (Grant ref: 102215/2/13/2) and the University of Bristol provide core support for ALSPAC. This publication is the work of the authors, and JPK and DME will serve as guarantors for the contents of this paper. JPK is funded by a Wellcome Trust 4-year PhD studentship in molecular, genetic, and life course epidemiology (WT083431MA). This work is supported by a Medical Research Council program grant (MC_UU_12013/4 to D.M.E). D.M.E. is supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (FT130101709).The Generation R Study: We gratefully acknowledge the contribution of children and parents, general practitioners, hospitals, midwives and pharmacies in Rotterdam. The generation and management of GWAS genotype data for the Generation R Study was done at the Genetic Laboratory of the Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus MC, The Netherlands. We thank Pascal Arp, Mila Jhamai, Marijn Verkerk, Lizbeth Herrera and Marjolein Peters for their help in creating, managing and QC of the GWAS database. The musculoskeletal research of the Generation R study is partly supported by the European Commission grant HEALTH-F2-2008-201865-GEFOS. The general design of Generation R Study is made possible by financial support from the Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw), the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport. Additionally, the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development supported authors of this manuscript (ZonMw 907.00303, ZonMw 916.10159, ZonMw VIDI 016.136.361 to V.W.V.J., and ZonMw VIDI 016.136.367 to F.R.)COPSAC: We express our gratitude to the participants of the COPSAC2000, COPSAC2010 and COPSAC-REGISTRY cohort study for all their support and commitment. We also acknowledge and appreciate the unique efforts of the COPSAC research team. The Bone Mineral Density in Childhood Study: BMDCS is extremely grateful to all the families who participated in this study, and the whole team, which includes interviewers, computer and laboratory technicians, clerical workers, research scientists, volunteers, managers, receptionists, and nurses. This work was funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) contracts NO1-HD-1-3228, -3329, -3330, -3331, -3332 and -3333, R01 HD058886 and the Clinical and Translational Research Center (5-MO1-RR-000240 and UL1 RR-026314).The CHARGE Consortium: Results from the meta-analysis of GWAS for lean body mass in adults were provided by the Musculoskeletal Working Group of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research on Genomic Epidemiology ("CHARGE", http://depts.washington.edu/chargeco/wiki/Main_Page), which is an international consortium of cohort studies focused on a variety of disease phenotypes. Building on GWAS for NHLBI-diseases: the U.S. CHARGE Consortium' was funded by the NIH (the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, ARRA, 5RC2HL102419). DPK was supported by a grant from the National institute on Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (R01 AR41398).