Journal article

Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) polymorphisms linked with psychosis transition are associated with enlarged lateral ventricles and white matter disruption in schizophrenia

CA Bousman, V Cropley, P Klauser, JL Hess, A Pereira, R Idrizi, J Bruggemann, MS Mostaid, R Lenroot, TW Weickert, SJ Glatt, IP Everall, S Sundram, A Zalesky, CS Weickert, C Pantelis

PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE | CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS | Published : 2018

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs4281084 and rs12155594) within the neuregulin-1 (NRG1) gene have been associated with psychosis transition. However, the neurobiological changes associated with these SNPs remain unclear. We aimed to determine what relationship these two SNPs have on lateral ventricular volume and white matter integrity, as abnormalities in these brain structures are some of the most consistent in schizophrenia. METHODS: Structural (n = 370) and diffusion (n = 465) magnetic resonance imaging data were obtained from affected and unaffected individuals predominantly of European descent. The SNPs rs4281084, rs12155594, and their combined allelic load wer..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD) Young Investigator Award


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Fellowship


Awarded by NARSAD Young Investigator Award


Awarded by Swiss Society for Medicine and Biology Scholarships


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) Principal Research Fellowship (PRF)


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors thank the Chief Investigators and ASRB Manager: Carr V, Schall U, Scott R, Jablensky A, Mowry B, Michie P, Catts S, Henskens F, Pantelis C, Loughland C. The authors acknowledge the help of Jason Bridge for ASRB database queries. Data for this study were provided, in part, by the Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank (ASRB), which is supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (Enabling Grant No. 386500), the Pratt Foundation, Ramsay Health Care, the Viertel Charitable Foundation, and the Schizophrenia Research Institute. CAB was supported by a University of Melbourne Ronald Phillip Griffith Fellowship and Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD) Young Investigator Award (20526). VC was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Fellowship (628880) and NARSAD Young Investigator Award (21660). PK was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation and the Swiss Society for Medicine and Biology Scholarships (148384). SJG and JLH were supported by grants from the US National Institutes of Health, the Gerber Foundation, the Sidney R. Baer, Jr. Foundation, and The Behavioral and Brain Research Foundation (NARSAD). SS, RI, and AP were supported by One-in-Five Association Incorporated. MSM was supported by a Cooperative Research Centre for Mental Health Top-up Scholarship. CSW is funded by the NSW Ministry of Health, Office of Health and Medical Research. CSW is a recipient of a National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) Principal Research Fellowship (PRF) (#1117079). CP was supported by an NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship (628386 and 1105825), and a Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD) Distinguished Investigator Award. None of the Funding Sources played any role in the study design; collection, analysisor interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the paper for publication.