Journal article

Evidence of a complex association between dose, pattern and timing of prenatal alcohol exposure and child behaviour problems

Colleen M O'Leary, Natasha Nassar, Stephen R Zubrick, Jennifer J Kurinczuk, Fiona Stanley, Carol Bower

ADDICTION | WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC | Published : 2010

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There is a lack of evidence regarding the effect of dose, pattern and timing of prenatal alcohol exposure and behaviour problems in children aged 2 years and older. METHODS: A 10% random sample of women delivering a live infant in Western Australia (1995-96) were invited to participate in an 8-year longitudinal survey (78% response rate n = 2224); 85% were followed-up at 2 years, 73% at 5 years and 61% at 8 years. Alcohol consumption was classified by combining the overall dose, dose per occasion and frequency to reflect realistic drinking patterns. Longitudinal analysis was conducted using generalized estimating equations (GEE) to investigate the association between child behavi..

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Grants

Awarded by Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by Department of Health and National Health Services Research and Development (NCC RCD)


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors thank Margaret Wood and Peter Cosgrove for maintenance of the databases and Peter Jacoby for statistical advice in generalized estimating equations. The authors thank the staff of the WA Data Linkage Unit for access to the WA Data Linkage System and for their assistance in obtaining the data, and the WA Health Data Custodians for access to the core health data sets. We are very grateful to the parents who have participated in the RASCALS study and for the support of the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, in particular the RASCALS study team. The Western Australian survey of health-related behaviours and events during pregnancy and early infancy was funded by grants from Healthway [the Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (#94/2705, #96/49078, #98/8016)], to whom we are most grateful. This study was supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) programme grant number 353514 (2005-09), NHMRC Research Fellowship (353628) (Dr Bower) and NHMRC Public Health (Australia) Fellowship (404118) (Dr Nassar). Dr Kurinczuk was funded partially by a National Public Health Career Scientist award from the Department of Health and National Health Services Research and Development (NCC RCD) (PHCS022) when this analysis was conducted.