Journal article

The effects of oral micronized progesterone on smoked cocaine self-administration in women

Stephanie Collins Reed, Suzette M Evans, Gillinder Bedi, Eric Rubin, Richard W Foltin

HORMONES AND BEHAVIOR | ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE | Published : 2011

Abstract

There are currently no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies for cocaine abuse. Converging preclinical and clinical evidence indicates that progesterone may have potential as a treatment for cocaine-abusing women, who represent a growing portion of cocaine users. We have previously shown that oral progesterone reduced the positive subjective effects of cocaine in female cocaine users during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, when endogenous progesterone levels were low. To extend these findings, the present study assessed the effects of oral progesterone (150 mg BID) administered during the follicular phase on smoked cocaine self-administration in women relative to the normal follicular a..

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Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was supported by grant nos. R01 DA008105 (RWF) and K01 DA022282 (SCR) from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The participants resided on the Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, supported by grant no. UL1-RR024156-02 from the National Institutes of Health. The authors gratefully acknowledge the expert assistance of the research and clinical staff, including Brenda Fay, R.N., Laura Burr, R.N, Alyce Stephens, R.N. and Alicia Couraud, R.N. The Women's International Pharmacy (Madison, WI) graciously provided the oral micronized progesterone and matching placebo. The cocaine self-administration data from the normal follicular and luteal phases presented here were also presented in a previously published review paper (Evans and Foltin, 2010. Does the response to cocaine differ as a function of sex or hormonal status in human and non-human primates? Horm. & Behav. 58, 13-21). The authors have no financial disclosures or conflicts of interest to report.