Journal article

Wireless induction coils embedded in diamond for power transfer in medical implants

Md Kabir Uddin Sikder, James Fallon, Mohit N Shivdasani, Kumaravelu Ganesan, Peter Seligman, David J Garrett

BIOMEDICAL MICRODEVICES | SPRINGER | Published : 2017

Abstract

Wireless power and data transfer to medical implants is a research area where improvements in current state-of-the-art technologies are needed owing to the continuing efforts for miniaturization. At present, lithographical patterning of evaporated metals is widely used for miniature coil fabrication. This method produces coils that are limited to low micron or nanometer thicknesses leading to high impedance values and thus limiting their potential quality. In the present work we describe a novel technique, whereby trenches were milled into a diamond substrate and filled with silver active braze alloy, enabling the manufacture of small, high cross-section, low impedance microcoils capable of ..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC) DECRA grant


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

Authors gratefully acknowledge Rodney Millard his support of this work during the electrical characterization of the microcoils and Owen Burns for helping conduct the ageing tests. This research and KS were supported by an Australian Research Council (ARC) DECRA grant DE130100922. DJG is supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia, grant GNT1101717. MNS is supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia, grant GNT1063093. The Bionics Institute acknowledges the support received from the Victorian Government through its Operational Infrastructure Program for this work. Imaging was conducted at the Melbourne Advanced Microscopy Facility housed within Bio21 at The University of Melbourne.