Journal article

Socioeconomic Position Is Associated With Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Mid-Childhood: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

Richard S Liu, Fiona K Mensah, John Carlin, Ben Edwards, Sarath Ranganathan, Michael Cheung, Terence Dwyer, Richard Saffery, Costan G Magnussen, Markus Juonala, Melissa Wake, David P Burgner

Journal of the American Heart Association | WILEY | Published : 2017

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Royal Children's Hospital Foundation


Awarded by National Heart Foundation of Australia


Awarded by Financial Markets Foundation for Children


Funding Acknowledgements

This work has been supported to date by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (1041352, 1109355), the Royal Children's Hospital Foundation (2014-241), Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, the University of Melbourne, National Heart Foundation of Australia (100660), Financial Markets Foundation for Children (2014-055) and Victorian Deaf Education Institute. The following authors were supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia: Clinical Postgraduate Research Scholarship (1114567) to Liu, Senior Research Fellowships (1046518) to Wake and (1064629) Burgner, Early Career Fellowship (1037449) and Career Development Fellowship (1111160) to Mensah. Liu is supported by an Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship. Magnussen is supported by the National Heart Foundation of Australia Future Leader Fellowship (100849). Juonala is supported by the Federal Research Grant of Finland to Turku University Hospital, Finnish Cardiovascular Foundation, Juho Vainio Foundation, Sigrid Juselius Foundation, Maud Kuistila Foundation, the Paulo Foundation, and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (Dame Elizabeth Murdoch Fellowship). Wake is supported by Cure Kids, New Zealand. Research at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute is supported by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Program. The funding bodies did not play any role in the study. This article uses unit record data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The study is conducted in partnership between the Department of Social Services (DSS), the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The findings and views reported in this article are those of the author and should not be attributed to DSS, AIFS or the ABS.