Journal article

Opening the Black Box of Cognitive-Behavioural Case Management in Clients with Ultra-High Risk for Psychosis

Jessica A Hartmann, Patrick D McGorry, Stefanie J Schmidt, G Paul Amminger, Hok Pan Yuen, Connie Markulev, Gregor E Berger, Eric YH Chen, Lieuwe de Haan, Ian B Hickie, Suzie Lavoie, Meredith J McHugh, Nilufar Mossaheb, Dorien H Nieman, Merete Nordentoft, Anita Riecher-Roessler, Miriam R Schafer, Monika Schloegelhofer, Stefan Smesny, Andrew Thompson Show all

PSYCHOTHERAPY AND PSYCHOSOMATICS | KARGER | Published : 2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is the first-choice treatment in clients with ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis. However, CBT is an umbrella term for a plethora of different strategies, and little is known about the association between the intensity and content of CBT and the severity of symptomatic outcome. METHODS: A sample of 268 UHR participants received 6 months of CBT with case management (CBCM) in the context of the multi-centre NEURAPRO trial with monthly assessments of attenuated psychotic symptoms (APS). Using multilevel regressions and controlling for the initial severity of APS, the associations between (1) number of CBCM sessions received and severity of APS an..

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Grants

Awarded by Stanley Medical Research Institute


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Australia Program Grant


Awarded by Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)-Rubicon Grant


Awarded by Senior Principal Research Fellowship from the NHMRC


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowships


Awarded by NHMRC Career Development Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by a grant from the Stanley Medical Research Institute (07TGF-1102), a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Australia Program Grant (ID: 566529; P.D.M., I.B.H., A.R.Y., and G.P.A.), and a grant from the Colonial Foundation. J.A.H. is supported by a Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)-Rubicon Grant (825.15.015). P.D.M. was supported by a Senior Principal Research Fellowship from the NHMRC (ID: 1060996), G.P.A. and A.R.Y. were supported by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowships (ID: 1080963 and 566593), and B.N. was supported by an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (ID: 1027532).