Journal article

Population genomics of virulence genes of Plasmodium falciparum in clinical isolates from Uganda

Shazia Ruybal-Pesantez, Kathryn E Tiedje, Gerry Tonkin-Hill, Thomas S Rask, Moses R Kamya, Bryan Greenhouse, Grant Dorsey, Michael F Duffy, Karen P Day

SCIENTIFIC REPORTS | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2017

Abstract

Plasmodium falciparum causes a spectrum of malarial disease from asymptomatic to uncomplicated through to severe. Investigations of parasite virulence have associated the expression of distinct variants of the major surface antigen of the blood stages known as Pf EMP1 encoded by up to 60 var genes per genome. Looking at the population genomics of var genes in cases of uncomplicated malaria, we set out to determine if there was any evidence of a selective sweep of specific var genes or clonal epidemic structure related to the incidence of uncomplicated disease in children. By sequencing the conserved DBLα domain of var genes from six sentinel sites in Uganda we found that the parasites causin..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health


Awarded by Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health (Program on the Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases (EEID))


Awarded by FOGARTY INTERNATIONAL CENTER


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the children and their families for their willingness to participate, as well as the Uganda Ministry of Health for their expertise and coordination at each of the sentinel sites across Uganda. We would like to thank all the field teams for the technical assistance and sample collection. Additionally we would like to recognize the laboratory personnel at New York University for their assistance with the laboratory experiments. Finally we thank everyone involved for his or her continued patience and understanding as this research was disrupted by Hurricane Sandy (New York, NY; October 29, 2012). This research was supported by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health [grant number R01-AI084156] and Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health (Program on the Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases (EEID)) [grant number R01-TW009670].