Journal article

Naturally acquired antibody responses to more than 300 Plasmodium vivax proteins in three geographic regions

Rhea J Longley, Michael T White, Eizo Takashima, Masayuki Morita, Bernard N Kanoi, Connie SN Li Wai Suen, Inoni Betuela, Andrea Kuehn, Piyarat Sripoorote, Camila T Franca, Peter Siba, Leanne J Robinson, Marcus Lacerda, Jetsumon Sattabongkot, Takafumi Tsuboi, Ivo Mueller

PLOS NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASES | PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE | Published : 2017

Abstract

Plasmodium vivax remains an important cause of malaria in South America and the Asia-Pacific. Naturally acquired antibody responses against multiple P. vivax proteins have been described in numerous countries, however, direct comparison of these responses has been difficult with different methodologies employed. We measured antibody responses against 307 P. vivax proteins at the time of P. vivax infection, and at 2-3 later time-points in three countries. We observed that seropositivity rates at the time of infection were highest in Thailand, followed by Brazil then PNG, reflecting the level of antigenic input. The majority of sero-reactive antigens in all sites induced short-lived antibody r..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH)


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Foundation Swiss National Science Foundation Grant


Awarded by Cellex Foundation and International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Early Career Fellowship


Awarded by JSPS KAKENHI


Awarded by Global Health Innovative Technology Fund


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research


Funding Acknowledgements

The Thai study was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH grant 5R01 AI 104822 to JS); and the PNG field study was supported by the TransEPI consortium funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates, the NHMRC (#1021544) Foundation Swiss National Science Foundation Grant [grant 310030_134889], the Cellex Foundation and International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research [grant U19 AI089686).IM is supported by an NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship (1043345), CTF was supported by the University of Melbourne - Melbourne International Postgraduate Scholarship (MIPS) and LJR was supported by an NHMRC Early Career Fellowship (1016443). TT was supported in part by JSPS KAKENHI (JP15H05276, JP16K15266) in Japan. This work has been supported by FIND with funding from the Australian Government and by the Global Health Innovative Technology Fund (T2015-142). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.