Journal article

Augmenting Influenza-Specific T Cell Memory Generation with a Natural Killer T Cell-Dependent Glycolipid-Peptide Vaccine

Regan J Anderson, Jasmine Li, Lukasz Kedzierski, Benjamin J Compton, Colin M Hayman, Taryn L Osmond, Ching-wen Tang, Kathryn J Farrand, Hui-Fern Koay, Catarina Filipa Dos Santos Sa E Almeida, Lauren R Holz, Geoffrey M Williams, Margaret A Brimble, Zhongfang Wang, Marios Koutsakos, Katherine Kedzierska, Dale I Godfrey, Ian F Hermans, Stephen J Turner, Gavin F Painter

ACS CHEMICAL BIOLOGY | AMER CHEMICAL SOC | Published : 2017

Abstract

The development of a universal vaccine for influenza A virus (IAV) that does not require seasonal modification is a long-standing health goal, particularly in the context of the increasing threat of new global pandemics. Vaccines that specifically induce T cell responses are of considerable interest because they can target viral proteins that are more likely to be shared between different virus strains and subtypes and hence provide effective cross-reactive IAV immunity. From a practical perspective, such vaccines should induce T cell responses with long-lasting memory, while also being simple to manufacture and cost-effective. Here we describe the synthesis and evaluation of a vaccine platf..

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Grants

Awarded by New Zealand Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment


Awarded by Genesis oncology trust


Awarded by Health Research Council of New Zealand


Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge the New Zealand Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment (Grant RTV1603), Genesis oncology trust (Grant GOT-1548-RPG), Avalia Immunotherapies, and the Health Research Council of New Zealand (Grant HRC 14/500) for financial support. Monomer supplied by the NIH Tetramer Core Facility was used to prepare a-GalCer-loaded CD1d tetramer. S.J.T., K.K., and D.I.G. are supported by NHMRC program Grants 1071916, 1013667, and 1113293. K.K. is supported by an NHMRC Senior Research fellowship, S.J.T. is supported by an NHMRC Principal Research Fellowship, and D.I.G is supported by an NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship (Grant 1117766).