Journal article

Modest ratios of fast food outlets to supermarkets and green grocers are associated with higher body mass index: Longitudinal analysis of a sample of 15,229 Australians aged 45 years and older in the Australian National Liveability Study

Xiaoqi Feng, Thomas Astell-Burt, Hannah Badland, Suzanne Mavoa, Billie Giles-Corti

HEALTH & PLACE | ELSEVIER SCI LTD | Published : 2018

Abstract

Food purchasing decisions are made within the context of the range of options available, yet most epidemiological studies focus upon single outlet types. Ratios of fast food outlets to supermarkets and green grocers were linked to addresses of 15,229 adults in the 45 and Up Study at baseline (2006-2008) and follow-up (2009-2010). Compared to having no fast food outlet but having healthy food outlets within 3.2km from home, multilevel growth curves revealed that relative exposure>25% fast food outlets were associated with 0.36-1.19kg/m2 higher BMI (p<0.05). These associations were consistent as people aged. No associations were observed for food outlets<0.8km.

Grants

Awarded by Australian Prevention Partnership Centre through the NHMRC partnership centre grant scheme


Awarded by National Heart Foundation of Australia Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Boosting Dementia Research Leadership Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC project grant


Awarded by NHMRC Principal Research Fellow Award


Awarded by NHMRC Early Career Fellowship


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Excellence in Healthy Liveable Communities


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was supported by The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre through the NHMRC partnership centre grant scheme (Grant ID: GNT9100001) with the Australian Government Department of Health, NSW Ministry of Health, ACT Health, HCF, and the HCF Research Foundation. Xiaoqi Feng is supported by a National Heart Foundation of Australia Fellowship (#100948). Thomas Astell-Burt is supported by an NHMRC Boosting Dementia Research Leadership Fellowship (#1140317). Xiaoqi Feng and Thomas Astell-Burt are also supported by an NHMRC project grant (#1101065). Billie Giles-Corti is supported by an NHMRC Principal Research Fellow Award (#1004900). Hannah Badland is supported by an RMIT University Vice Chancellor's Senior Research Fellowship. Suzanne Mavoa is supported by an NHMRC Early Career Fellowship (#1121035). Suzanne Mavoa is also in part supported by VicHealth and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Excellence in Healthy Liveable Communities (#1061404). This research was completed using data collected through the 45 and Up Study (www.saxinstitute.org.au). The 45 and Up Study is managed by the Sax Institute in collaboration with major partner Cancer Council NSW; and partners: the National Heart Foundation of Australia (NSW Division); NSW Ministry of Health; NSW Government Family & Community Services - Ageing, Carers and the Disability Council NSW; and the Australian Red Cross Blood Service. We thank the many thousands of people participating in the 45 and Up Study. We also thank the journal referees and Editor for their helpful and insightful reviews of the manuscript.