Journal article

Translating genomics into practice for real-time surveillance and response to carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae: evidence from a complex multi-institutional KPC outbreak

Jason C Kwong, Courtney R Lane, Finn Romanes, Anders Goncalves da Silva, Marion Easton, Katie Cronin, Mary Jo Waters, Takehiro Tomita, Kerrie Stevens, Mark B Schultz, Sarah L Baines, Norelle L Sherry, Glen P Carter, Andre Mu, Michelle Sait, Susan A Ballard, Torsten Seemann, Timothy P Stinear, Benjamin P Howden

PEERJ | PEERJ INC | Published : 2018

Abstract

Background: Until recently, Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Enterobacteriaceae were rarely identified in Australia. Following an increase in the number of incident cases across the state of Victoria, we undertook a real-time combined genomic and epidemiological investigation. The scope of this study included identifying risk factors and routes of transmission, and investigating the utility of genomics to enhance traditional field epidemiology for informing management of established widespread outbreaks. Methods: All KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates referred to the state reference laboratory from 2012 onwards were included. Whole-genome sequencing was performed in..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

Funding for this study was provided by the Department of Health & Human Services, Victoria State Government and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity. Jason C. Kwong (GNT1074824, and via the Centre for Research Excellence in Emerging Infectious Diseases, GNT1102962), Norelle L. Sherry (GNT1093468), Timothy P. Stinear (GNT1105525) and Benjamin P. Howden (GNT1105905) are supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia. Sarah L. Baines is supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award. Jason C. Kwong, Sarah L. Baines and Norelle L. Sherry are also supported by Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarships. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.