Journal article

Initial acquisition and succession of the cystic fibrosis lung microbiome is associated with disease progression in infants and preschool children

Marianne S Muhlebach, Bryan T Zorn, Charles R Esther, Joseph E Hatch, Conor P Murray, Lidija Turkovic, Sarath C Ranganathan, Richard C Boucher, Stephen M Stick, Matthew C Wolfgang

PLOS PATHOGENS | PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE | Published : 2018

Abstract

The cystic fibrosis (CF) lung microbiome has been studied in children and adults; however, little is known about its relationship to early disease progression. To better understand the relationship between the lung microbiome and early respiratory disease, we characterized the lower airways microbiome using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples obtained from clinically stable CF infants and preschoolers who underwent bronchoscopy and chest computed tomography (CT). Cross-sectional samples suggested a progression of the lower airways microbiome with age, beginning with relatively sterile airways in infancy. By age two, bacterial sequences typically associated with the oral cavity dominated low..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by Cystic Fibrosis Foundation


Awarded by NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES


Funding Acknowledgements

The National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence provided funding (App1000896) to SMS for AREST CF investigators. Funding from the National Institutes of Health (HL116228) to MSM and CRE supported investigators and microbiome studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Additional technical resources were provided by the Marsico Lung Institute Molecular Biology Core, which was supported by funds from the National Institutes of Health (HL110873, DK065988) and Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (BOUCHE15R0). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.