Journal article

Active Trachoma Cases in the Solomon Islands Have Varied Polymicrobial Community Structures but Do Not Associate with Individual Non-Chlamydial Pathogens of the Eye

Robert MR Butcher, Oliver Sokana, Kelvin Jack, Eric Kalae, Leslie Sui, Charles Russell, Joanna Houghton, Christine Palmer, Martin J Holland, Richard T Le Mesurier, Anthony W Solomon, David CW Mabey, Chrissy H Roberts

FRONTIERS IN MEDICINE | FRONTIERS MEDIA SA | Published : 2018

Abstract

Background: Several non-chlamydial microbial pathogens are associated with clinical signs of active trachoma in trachoma-endemic communities with a low prevalence of ocular Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) infection. In the Solomon Islands, the prevalence of Ct among children is low despite the prevalence of active trachoma being moderate. Therefore, we set out to investigate whether active trachoma was associated with a common non-chlamydial infection or with a dominant polymicrobial community dysbiosis in the Solomon Islands. Methods: We studied DNA from conjunctival swabs collected from 257 Solomon Islanders with active trachoma and matched controls. Droplet digital PCR was used to test for pat..

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Grants

Awarded by United Kingdom's Department for International Development Global Trachoma Mapping Project grant


Awarded by Fred Hollows Foundation, Australia


Awarded by Wellcome Trust Intermediate Fellowship


Awarded by Wellcome Trust


Awarded by Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund


Funding Acknowledgements

Fieldwork was jointly funded by the United Kingdom's Department for International Development Global Trachoma Mapping Project grant (ARIES: 203145) to Sightsavers, and by the Fred Hollows Foundation, Australia (1041). Laboratory costs were funded by the Fred Hollows Foundation, Australia (1041). RB and AS were funded by a Wellcome Trust Intermediate Fellowship (098521). OS, KJ, EK, LS, and CR were employees of the Solomon Islands Ministry of Health and Medical Services, but fees for conducting the survey were paid by the study grants. MH was supported by the Wellcome Trust (093368/Z/10/Z). ChR was supported by the Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund (105609/Z/14/Z).