Journal article

Global White Matter Diffusion Characteristics Predict Longitudinal Cognitive Change Independently of Amyloid Status in Clinically Normal Older Adults

Jennifer S Rabin, Rodrigo D Perea, Rachel F Buckley, Taylor E Neal, Randy L Buckner, Keith A Johnson, Reisa A Sperling, Trey Hedden

CEREBRAL CORTEX | OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC | Published : 2019

Abstract

White matter degradation has been proposed as one possible explanation for age-related cognitive decline. In the present study, we examined 2 main questions: 1) Do diffusion characteristics predict longitudinal change in cognition independently or synergistically with amyloid status? 2) Are the effects of diffusion characteristics on longitudinal cognitive change tract-specific or global in nature? Cognitive domains of executive function, episodic memory, and processing speed were measured annually (mean follow-up = 3.93 ± 1.25 years). Diffusion tensor imaging and Pittsburgh Compound-B positron emission tomography were performed at baseline in 265 clinically normal older adults (aged 63-90)...

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Grants

Awarded by National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health


Awarded by National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health


Awarded by NIH


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF BIOMEDICAL IMAGING AND BIOENGINEERING


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health (P01 AG036694 to R.A.S. and K.A.J, K24 AG035007 to R.A.S., R01 AG053509 and K01 AG040197 to T.H., R01 AG034556 to R.L.B., and P50 AG005134), and a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Postdoctoral Fellowship Award to J.S.R. This research was carried out in part at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at the Massachusetts General Hospital, using resources provided by the Center for Functional Neuroimaging Technologies, P41EB015896, a P41 Biotechnology Resource Grant supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health. This work also involved the use of instrumentation supported by the NIH Shared Instrumentation Grant Program and/or High-End Instrumentation Grant Program; specifically, grant numbers S10RR023401, S10RR019307, S10RR019254, and S10RR023043.