Journal article

Human blood MAIT cell subsets defined using MR1 tetramers

Nicholas A Gherardin, Michael NT Souter, Hui-Fern Koay, Kirstie M Mangas, Torsten Seemann, Timothy P Stinear, Sidonia BG Eckle, Stuart P Berzins, Yves d'Udekem, Igor E Konstantinov, David P Fairlie, David S Ritchie, Paul J Neeson, Daniel G Pellicci, Adam P Uldrich, James McCluskey, Dale I Godfrey

IMMUNOLOGY AND CELL BIOLOGY | WILEY | Published : 2018

Abstract

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells represent up to 10% of circulating human T cells. They are usually defined using combinations of non-lineage-specific (surrogate) markers such as anti-TRAV1-2, CD161, IL-18Rα and CD26. The development of MR1-Ag tetramers now permits the specific identification of MAIT cells based on T-cell receptor specificity. Here, we compare these approaches for identifying MAIT cells and show that surrogate markers are not always accurate in identifying these cells, particularly the CD4+ fraction. Moreover, while all MAIT cell subsets produced comparable levels of IFNγ, TNF and IL-17A, the CD4+ population produced more IL-2 than the other subsets. In a human on..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia ((NHMRC)


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC)


Awarded by ARC Future Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

We are grateful to Dr Paul Savage (Brigham Young University, UT, USA) for providing a-GalCer analogue PBS-44 and Bronwyn Meehan for provision of MR1 monomers. We thank Tina Luke and staff members from the Flow Cytometry facility at the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at The University of Melbourne. This work was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia ((NHMRC) 1013667, 1063587 and 1113293) and the Australian Research Council (ARC; CE140100011 and LE110100106). NAG was supported by a Leukaemia Foundation of Australia Postgraduate Scholarship and a Cancer Council Victoria Postdoctoral Fellowship; MNTS is supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award; APU is supported by an ARC Future Fellowship (FT140100278); TPS is supported by an NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship (1105525); DPF is supported by an NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship (1027369, 1117017). DIG is supported by an NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship (1020770, 1117766).