Journal article

Sexual Dimorphism of Resting-State Network Connectivity in Healthy Ageing

Sharna D Jamadar, Francesco Sforazzini, Parnesh Raniga, Nicholas J Ferris, Bryan Paton, Michael J Bailey, Amy Brodtmann, Paul A Yates, Geoffrey A Donnan, Stephanie A Ward, Robyn L Woods, Elsdon Storey, John J McNeil, Gary F Egan

The Journals of Gerontology: Series B | OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC | Published : 2019

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The onset of many illnesses is confounded with age and sex. Increasing age is a risk factor for the development of many illnesses, and sexual dimorphism influences brain anatomy, function, and cognition. Here, we examine frequency-specific connectivity in resting-state networks in a large sample (n = 406) of healthy aged adults. METHOD: We quantify frequency-specific connectivity in three resting-state networks known to be implicated in age-related decline: the default mode, dorsal attention, and salience networks, using multiband functional magnetic resonance imaging. Frequency-specific connectivity was quantified in four bands: low (0.015-0.027 Hz), moderately low (0.027-0.073 ..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function


Awarded by ARC


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Project Grant (APP1086188). ASPREE was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grant number U01AG029824); the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (grant numbers 334047, 1127060); Monash University (Australia) and the Victorian Cancer Agency (Australia). GE and SJ are supported by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function (CE140100007). SJ is supported by an ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DE150100406). The Principal ASPREE study is registered with the International Standardized Randomized Controlled Trials Register, ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly, Number: ISRCTN83772183 and clinicaltrials.gov number NCT01038583. ASPREE-Neuro trial is registered with Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001313729.