Journal article

Consumption of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks and risk of obesity-related cancers

Allison M Hodge, Julie K Bassett, Roger L Milne, Dallas R English, Graham G Giles

PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION | CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS | Published : 2018

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that more frequent consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks would be associated with increased risk of obesity-related cancers. Associations for artificially sweetened soft drinks were assessed for comparison. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with cancers identified by linkage to cancer registries. At baseline, participants completed a 121-item FFQ including separate questions about the number of times in the past year they had consumed sugar-sweetened or artificially sweetened soft drinks. Anthropometric measurements, including waist circumference, were taken and questions about smoking, leisure-time physical activity and intake of alcoholic beverages wer..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (MCCS) recruitment was funded by VicHealth and Cancer Council Victoria. The MCCS was further supported by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (grant numbers 209057, 251553 and 504711) and by infrastructure provided by Cancer Council Victoria.