Journal article

Intermittent Preventive Therapy in Pregnancy and Incidence of Low Birth Weight in Malaria-Endemic Countries

Jordan E Cates, Daniel Westreich, Holger W Unger, Melissa Bauserman, Linda Adair, Stephen R Cole, Steven Meshnick, Stephen J Rogerson

American Journal of Public Health | AMER PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOC INC | Published : 2018

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To estimate the impact of hypothetical antimalarial and nutritional interventions (which reduce the prevalence of low midupper arm circumference [MUAC]) on the incidence of low birth weight (LBW). METHODS: We analyzed data from 14 633 pregnancies from 13 studies conducted across Africa and the Western Pacific from 1996 to 2015. We calculated population intervention effects for increasing intermittent preventive therapy in pregnancy (IPTp), full coverage with bed nets, reduction in malaria infection at delivery, and reductions in the prevalence of low MUAC. RESULTS: We estimated that, compared with observed IPTp use, administering 3 or more doses of IPTp to all women would decreas..

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Grants

Awarded by European Union


Awarded by US Agency for International Development


Awarded by Academy of Finland


Awarded by MiP Consortium, from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation


Awarded by Pregvax Consortium, through a grant from the EU FP7-2007-HEALTH


Awarded by Pfizer


Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health (Pre-doctoral Training in Infectious Disease Epidemiology grant)


Awarded by EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

The STOPPAM project, "Strategies to Prevent Pregnancy Associated Malaria," was supported by the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme; STOPPAM contract number: 200889 STOPPAM I (Benin) and STOPPAM II (Tanzania). The Micronutriments-Sante de la Mere et de l'Enfant (FSP/MISAME) study (Burkina Faso) was funded by Nutrition Third World, The Belgium Ministry of Development, Flemish Interuniversity Council, and French Ministry of Development. The ECHO study (Democratic Republic of the Congo) was funded by the Department of Epidemiology, UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. The International Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements (iLiNS-DYAD) trial (Ghana) was funded by a grant to the University of California, Davis, from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Evaluations of Medications Used in Early Pregnancy (EMEP) was partly supported by the Malaria in Pregnancy (MiP) Consortium, which is funded through a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, UK, and partly by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, through a cooperative agreement with Kenya Medical Research Institute, Center for Global Health Research, Kisumu, Kenya. The Intermittent Preventive Treatment during Pregnancy Monitoring (IPTp-MON) study (Kenya) was partly supported by the MiP Consortium, which is funded through a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, and partly supported by the CDC. The Insecticide-Treated Bed Nets (ITN) project (Kenya) was funded by the US Agency for International Development. The Special Health Support Fund from the Royal Netherlands Embassy (Nairobi, Kenya) provided additional support for the study of the impact of insecticide-treated bed nets in pregnancy. The Kisumu study (Kenya) was funded by US Agency for International Development (grants AOT0483-PH1-2171 and HRN-A-00-04-00010-02) and the Netherlands Foundation for the Advancement of Tropical Research. The Intermittent Screening and Treatment or Intermittent Preventive Treatment for the Control of Malaria in Pregnancy (STOPMIP) study (Kenya) was funded by the MiP Consortium, which is funded through a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. The Intermittent Screening and Treatment (ISTp) study (Malawi) was partly supported by the MiP Consortium, which is funded through a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, and partly funded by the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership. The Lungwena Antenatal Intervention Study (LAIS) was supported by grants from the Academy of Finland (grants 79787 and 207010), the Foundation for Pediatric Research in Finland, and the Medical Research Fund of Tampere University Hospital. Azithromycin and its placebo were provided free of charge by Pfizer (New York, NY), which also provided funding for the polymerase chain reaction testing of the sexually transmitted infections. The IPTp study (Papua New Guinea [PNG]) was funded by the MiP Consortium, through a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (46099); the Pregvax Consortium, through a grant from the EU FP7-2007-HEALTH (PREGVAX 201588) and the Spanish Government (EUROSALUD 2008 Programme); and Pfizer, through an investigator-initiated research grant (WS394663).The Sek study (PNG) was supported by the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID; grant to PNG Institute of Medical Research), the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia; Australian Research Council; Wellcome Trust; and Veterans Affairs Research Service. The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute is supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Infrastructure for Research Institutes Support Scheme and Victorian State Government Operational Infrastructure Support. J. E. Cates was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health (Pre-doctoral Training in Infectious Disease Epidemiology grant 5 T32 AI070114).