Journal article

Mistreatment of women during childbirth in Abuja, Nigeria: a qualitative study on perceptions and experiences of women and healthcare providers

Meghan A Bohren, Joshua P Vogel, Ozge Tuncalp, Bukola Fawole, Musibau A Titiloye, Akinpelu Olanrewaju Olutayo, Modupe Ogunlade, Agnes A Oyeniran, Olubunmi R Osunsan, Loveth Metiboba, Hadiza A Idris, Francis E Alu, Olufemi T Oladapo, A Metin Gulmezoglu, Michelle J Hindin

REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH | BMC | Published : 2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Global efforts have increased facility-based childbirth, but substantial barriers remain in some settings. In Nigeria, women report that poor provider attitudes influence their use of maternal health services. Evidence also suggests that women in Nigeria may experience mistreatment during childbirth; however, there is limited understanding of how and why mistreatment this occurs. This study uses qualitative methods to explore women and providers' experiences and perceptions of mistreatment during childbirth in two health facilities and catchment areas in Abuja, Nigeria. METHODS: In-depth interviews (IDIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs) were used with a purposive sample of wom..

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Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

The funders had no role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. Funding for this project was received from The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction (HRP), Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization. Meghan Bohren was also supported by the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Bernard and Jane Guyer Scholarship in Maternal and Child Health, and the Caroline Cochran Scholarship in Population and Reproductive Health.