Journal article

Endometrial cancer risk and survival by tumor MMR status

Christina M Nagle, Tracy A O'Mara, Yen Tan, Daniel D Buchanan, Andreas Obermair, Penny Blomfield, Michael A Quinn, Penelope M Webb, Amanda B Spurdle

JOURNAL OF GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY | KOREAN SOC GYNECOLOGY ONCOLOGY & COLPOSCOPY | Published : 2018

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The risk of developing endometrial cancer (EC) and/or survival following a diagnosis of EC might differ by tumor DNA mismatch repair (MMR) status. We assessed the association between tumor MMR status (classified as MMR-proficient, somatic MMR-deficient, germline MMR-deficient) and the risk of developing EC and survival following a diagnosis of EC. METHODS: We analyzed data from women who participated in the Australian National Endometrial Cancer Study (ANECS) conducted between 2005 and 2007. Risk analyses (698 cases/691 population controls) utilized sociodemographic and lifestyle information obtained from telephone interviews at recruitment. For survival analyses (728 cases), pati..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by Cancer Council Queensland


Awarded by Cancer Council Tasmania


Awarded by Cancer Australia Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme


Awarded by Cancer Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

The Australian National Endometrial Cancer Study was supported by project grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (grant number: 339435); the Cancer Council Queensland (grant number: 4196615); Cancer Council Tasmania (grant number: 403031 and 457636); the Cancer Australia Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme (grant number: 552468), Cancer Australia (grant number: 1010859). A.B.S. and P.W. are supported by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowships. Y.Y.T. was supported by an International Postgraduate Research Scholarship, the University of Queensland Centennial Scholarship, and Advantage Top-Up Scholarship. D.D.B. is supported by a University of Melbourne Research at Melbourne Accelerator Program (R@MAP) Senior Research Fellow and NHMRC R.D. Wright Career Development Fellow. T.A.O'M. is supported by an NHMRC Early Career Fellowship.