Journal article

Association of CRTC1 polymorphisms with obesity markers in subjects from the general population with lifetime depression

Lina Quteineh, Martin Preisig, Margarita Rivera, Yuri Milaneschi, Enrique Castelao, Mehdi Gholam-Rezaee, Frederik Vandenberghe, Nuria Saigi-Morgui, Aurelie Delacretaz, Jean-Rene Cardinaux, Gonneke Willemsen, Dorret I Boomsma, Brenda WJH Penninx, Ana Ching-Lopez, Philippe Conus, Chin B Eap

JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS | ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV | Published : 2016

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Psychiatric disorders have been hypothesized to share common etiological pathways with obesity, suggesting related neurobiological bases. We aimed to examine whether CRTC1 polymorphisms were associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and to test the association of these polymorphisms with obesity markers in several large case-control samples with MDD. METHODS: The association between CRTC1 polymorphisms and MDD was investigated in three case-control samples with MDD (PsyCoLaus n1=3,362, Radiant n2=3,148 and NESDA/NTR n3=4,663). The effect of CRTC1 polymorphisms on obesity markers was then explored. RESULTS: CRTC1 polymorphisms were not associated with MDD in the three sample..

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Grants

Awarded by Swiss National Research Foundation from Takeda


Awarded by Swiss National Science Foundation


Awarded by GlaxoSmithKline


Awarded by European Commission Framework 6 grant, EC Contract


Awarded by MagW/ZonMW grants


Awarded by Geestkracht program of the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development


Awarded by Genetic influences on stability and change in psychopathology from childhood to young adulthood


Awarded by NBIC/BioAssist/RK


Awarded by Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure (BBMRI-NL)


Awarded by European Science Council (ERC Advanced)


Awarded by Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN) of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, Rutgers University Cell and DNA Repository


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by Medical Research Council


Awarded by EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH &HUMAN DEVELOPMENT


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH


Funding Acknowledgements

CBE received research support the Swiss National Research Foundation (320030-120686 and 324730-144064), from Takeda and from the Roche Organ Transplantation Research Foundation in the past 3 years. The CoLaus/PsyCoLaus study received financial contributions from GlaxoSmithKline, the Faculty of Biology and Medicine of Lausanne, the Swiss National Science Foundation (105993, 118308, 122661, 139468, 148401).The Radiant study was funded by the Medical Research Council, UK. GlaxoSmithKline (G0701420) funded the DeNT study and they were co-funder with the Medical Research Centre for the GWAS of the whole sample. The GENDEP study was funded by a European Commission Framework 6 grant, EC Contract Ref.: LSHB-CT-2003-503428. This study presents independent research [part-] funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety and Netherland Twin Register: funding was obtained from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) and MagW/ZonMW grants Middelgroot-911-09-032, Spinozapremie 56-464-14192, Geestkracht program of the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMW 10-000-1002), Center for Medical Systems Biology (CSMB, NOW Genomics), Genetic influences on stability and change in psychopathology from childhood to young adulthood (ZonMW 912-10-020), NBIC/BioAssist/RK (2008.024), Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure (BBMRI-NL, 184.021.007), VU University's Institute for Health and Care Research (EMGO+) and Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam (NCA); the European Science Council (ERC Advanced, 230374). Part of the genotyping and analyses were funded by the Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN) of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, Rutgers University Cell and DNA Repository (NIMH U24 MH068457-06), the Avera Institute, Sioux Falls, South Dakota (USA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH R01 HD042157-01A1, MH081802, Grand Opportunity grants 1RC2 MH089951 and 1RC2 MH089995). Computing was supported by BiG Grid, the Dutch e-Science Grid, which is financially supported by NWO.