Journal article

Development of mucosal-associated invariant T cells

Hui-Fern Koay, Dale I Godfrey, Daniel G Pellicci

IMMUNOLOGY AND CELL BIOLOGY | WILEY | Published : 2018

Abstract

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells develop in the thymus and migrate into the periphery to become the largest antigen-specific αβ T-cell population in the human immune system. However, the frequency of MAIT cells varies widely between human individuals, and the basis for this is unclear. While MAIT cells are highly conserved through evolution and are phenotypically similar between humans and mice, they represent a much smaller proportion of total T cells in mice. In this review, we discuss how MAIT cells transition through a three-stage development pathway in both mouse and human thymus, and continue to mature and expand after they leave the thymus. Moreover, we will explore and spe..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Career Development Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC)


Funding Acknowledgements

DGP is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Career Development Fellowship (1144308). DIG is supported by an NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship (1020770 and 1117766). The authors are supported by NHMRC project grants 1145373, 1122890 and 1140126 and the Australian Research Council (ARC; CE140100011).