Journal article

A human monoclonal antibody prevents malaria infection by targeting a new site of vulnerability on the parasite

Neville K Kisalu, Azza H Idris, Connor Weidle, Yevel Flores-Garcia, Barbara J Flynn, Brandon K Sack, Sean Murphy, Arne Schoen, Ernesto Freire, Joseph R Francica, Alex B Miller, Jason Gregory, Sandra March, Hua-Xin Liao, Barton F Haynes, Kevin Wiehe, Ashley M Trama, Kevin O Saunders, Morgan A Gladden, Anthony Monroe Show all

Nature Medicine | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2018

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by National Science Foundation


Awarded by Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the United States Department of Energy


Awarded by Federal funds from the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health


Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Small Business Innovation Research Grants


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES


Awarded by OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank the study volunteers from the malaria clinical trials VRC312 and VRC314. We thank R. Bailer (Vaccine Research Center, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health), for providing peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. We thank R. Lynch, S. Narpala, M. Prabhakaran, R. Nguyen and X. Chen (Vaccine Research Center, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health) for technical help and advice regarding the experiments. We thank I. Cockburn (Australian National University College of Health and Medicine) for providing some of the biotinylated (NANP) 9 probe used here. We thank T. Zhou (Vaccine Research Center, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health) for providing monoclonal antibody VRC01. We thank C. Peckels, A. Foulger, A. Holland and M. Wang (Duke Human Vaccine Institute (DHVI)) for technical assistance and H. Bouton-Verville (DHVI) for project management. We are grateful to C. A. Schramm's expertise and assistance in analyzing the malaria Pf3K database. We thank the Sanaria Manufacturing Team for the production of fresh PfSPZ. We thank M. Nason for technical help with statistical analysis. We thank B. Graham (Vaccine Research Center, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health) for insightful discussion regarding the project. We are particularly grateful to L. Stamatatos for use of laboratory space and equipment. We thank the J. B. Pendleton Charitable Trust for its generous support of Formulatrix robotic instruments. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health grant GM56550 and the National Science Foundation grant MCB-1157506 to E.F. M.P. and C.W. were supported by a Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division Faculty Initiative Grant through the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. X-ray diffraction data was collected at the Berkeley Center for Structural Biology beamlines 5.0.1 and 5.0.2, which are supported in part by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health. The Advanced Light Source is supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the United States Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-05CH11231. Work done at Duke Universiy has been funded in part with Federal funds from the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, under Contract No. HHSN261200800001E. Production and characterization of the PfSPZ Vaccine were supported in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Small Business Innovation Research Grants 5R44AI058375-08 (to S.L.H.).