Journal article

A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of peer support for people with severe mental illness

Brynmor Lloyd-Evans, Evan Mayo-Wilson, Bronwyn Harrison, Hannah Istead, Ellie Brown, Stephen Pilling, Sonia Johnson, Tim Kendall

BMC PSYCHIATRY | BMC | Published : 2014

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Little is known about whether peer support improves outcomes for people with severe mental illness. METHOD: A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted. Cochrane CENTRAL Register, Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and CINAHL were searched to July 2013 without restriction by publication status. Randomised trials of non-residential peer support interventions were included. Trial interventions were categorised and analysed separately as: mutual peer support, peer support services, or peer delivered mental health services. Meta-analyses were performed where possible, and studies were assessed for bias and the quality of evidence described. RESULTS: Eighteen trials including 5597 par..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by United Kingdom National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)


Awarded by National Institute for Health Research


Funding Acknowledgements

In addition to the authors, Sarah Stockton (National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health) developed the search strategy. This work contributed to the United Kingdom National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health guideline about the treatment of schizophrenia and psychosis in adults. This paper also constitutes development work for the CORE Study, a research programme involving SJ, BLE, HI and EB funded by the United Kingdom National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under its Programme Grants for Applied Research programme (Reference Number: RP-PG-0109-10078). The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the UK NIHR or the UK Department of Health.