Journal article

Prevent crime and save money: Return-on-investment models in Australia

Jessica A Heerde, John W Toumbourou, Sheryl A Hemphill, Ha Le, Todd Herrenkohl, Richard F Catalano

TRENDS AND ISSUES IN CRIME AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE | AUSTRALIAN INST CRIMINOLOGY | Published : 2018

Abstract

Finding effective ways to prevent crime is important. This project was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of combining data from a 12-year Australian longitudinal study (N=2,885) with prevention strategy investment data to estimate potential returns, including a reduction in intimate partner violence and prison entry. The project investigated the return on investment achievable in Victoria with a $150 million investment in a mix of six evidence-based prevention strategies. The study estimated that the 10-year lag effect of investing an extra $150 million was a five percent reduction in incarceration and a four percent reduction in cases of intimate partner violence involving phy..

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Grants

Awarded by Criminology Research Grant (CRG)


Awarded by National Institute on Drug Abuse


Awarded by National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful for the financial support of the Criminology Research Grant (CRG 18/14-15) for the analyses of data in this area of research. We are grateful for the corrective feedback of staff from the Washington State Institute of Public Policy, while remaining responsible for any shortcomings of our report. The authors wish to express their appreciation and thanks to project staff and participants for their valuable contribution to the IYDS project. Data collection for the IYDS was supported through a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (DA-012140-05), whereas data analysis was supported through a grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (1R01AA017188-01), National Institutes of Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services. Data collection and analysis was also supported through grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council (Projects 491241, 94793, and 1047902) and the Australian Research Council (DP109574, DPO663371 and DPO877359). Dr Heerde is supported by a Westpac Bicentennial Foundation Research Fellowship.