Journal article

Calculation of the age of the first infection for skin sores and scabies in five remote communities in northern Australia

MJ Lydeamore, PT Campbell, W Cuningham, RM Andrews, T Kearns, D Clucas, R Gundjirryirr Dhurrkay, J Carapetis, SYC Tong, JM McCaw, J McVernon

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND INFECTION | CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS | Published : 2018

Abstract

Prevalence of skin sores and scabies in remote Australian Aboriginal communities remains unacceptably high, with Group A Streptococcus (GAS) the dominant pathogen. We aim to better understand the drivers of GAS transmission using mathematical models. To estimate the force of infection, we quantified the age of first skin sores and scabies infection by pooling historical data from three studies conducted across five remote Aboriginal communities for children born between 2001 and 2005. We estimated the age of the first infection using the Kaplan-Meier estimator; parametric exponential mixture model; and Cox proportional hazards. For skin sores, the mean age of the first infection was approxim..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Infectious Diseases Modelling to Inform Public Health Policy


Funding Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the Menzies School for Health Research and related project staff, for providing the data from the EAHSP, staff at the primary health care centres and the members of the five remote indigenous communities for their participation. We acknowledge our partners in this work: Northern Territory Remote Health, Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory, Northern Territory Centre for Disease Control, One Disease and Miwatj Health and the NHMRC funded HOT NORTH initiative. We acknowledge the Lowitja Institute and the Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal Health who originally funded and lent significant support to the EAHSP. We would like to thank B. J. Currie for his contributions. M. J. Lydeamore is funded by an Australian Postgraduate Research Training Program Scholarship; This work is supported by an NHMRC Project Grant titled 'Optimising intervention strategies to reduce the burden of Group A Streptococcus in Aboriginal Communities' (GNT1098319). We thank the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Infectious Diseases Modelling to Inform Public Health Policy (GNT1078068). J. McVernon is supported by an NHMRC Principal Research Fellowship (GNT1117140). S. Tong is supported by an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (GNT1145033).