Journal article

Critical illness with AH1N1v influenza in pregnancy: a comparison of two population-based cohorts

M Knight, M Pierce, I Seppelt, JJ Kurinczuk, P Spark, P Brocklehurst, C McLintock, E Sullivan

BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY | WILEY | Published : 2011

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare admissions to intensive care units (ICUs) with confirmed AH1N1v influenza in pregnancy in Australia, New Zealand and the UK. DESIGN: National cohort studies. SETTING: ICUs in Australia, New Zealand and the UK. POPULATION: Fifty-nine women admitted to ICUs in Australia and New Zealand in June-August 2009, and 57 women admitted to ICUs in the UK in September 2009-January 2010. METHODS: Comparison of cohort data. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of ICU admission, comparison of characteristics and outcomes. RESULTS: There was a significantly higher ICU admission risk in Australia and New Zealand than in the UK (risk ratio 2.59, 95% CI 1.75-3.85). Indigenous women from Austr..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia)


Funding Acknowledgements

The ANZIC Influenza Investigators registry is supported by: the Department of Health and Ageing, Commonwealth Government of Australia; New South Wales Health, Government of New South Wales; Department of Health, Government of Victoria; the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre; the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society; and an unrestricted grant from CSL, Melbourne, Victoria. The Australasian Maternity Outcomes Surveillance System is supported by National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) project grant, no. 510298. The UK Obstetric Surveillance System study was funded by a grant from the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment Programme. MK is funded by the National Institute for Health Research National Coordinating Centre for Research Capacity Development. None of the funders had any role in the study design and the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data, or in the writing of the article and the decision to submit it for publication. The researchers confirm their independence from funders and sponsors.