Journal article

Living in areas with different levels of earthquake damage and association with risk of cardiovascular disease: a cohort-linkage study

Andrea M Teng, Tony Blakely, Vivienne Ivory, Simon Kingham, Vicky Cameron

The Lancet Planetary Health | ELSEVIER SCI LTD | Published : 2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease rates are known to increase immediately after a severe earthquake. However, less is known about the magnitude of this increase over time in relation to the amount of housing damage. We assessed the effect of area housing damage from a major earthquake sequence in Christchurch, Canterbury province, New Zealand, on cardiovascular disease-related hospital admissions and deaths. METHODS: For this cohort-linkage study, we used linked administrative datasets from the Statistics New Zealand Integrated Data Infrastructure to identify individuals aged 45 years or older living in Christchurch from the date of the first earthquake on Sept 4, 2010. Individuals were ass..

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Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

Healthier Lives National Science Challenge and Natural Hazards Research Platform, Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment.The results in this Article are not official statistics. They have been created for research purposes from the Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI), managed by Statistics New Zealand (NZ). The opinions, findings, recommendations, and conclusions expressed are those of the researchers, not Statistics NZ or MBIE. Access to the anonymised data used in this study was provided by Statistics NZ under the security and confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act 1975. Only people authorised by the Statistics Act 1975 are allowed to see data about a particular person, household, business, or organisation, and the results in this Article have been confidentialised to protect these groups from identification and to keep their data safe. Careful consideration has been given to the privacy, security, and confidentiality issues associated with using administrative and survey data in the IDI. Further detail can be found in the Privacy impact assessment for the IDI available from www.stats.govt.nz.We thank the Earthquake Commission for sharing property damage information and assisting with its interpretation; Chris Bowie (Opus, Lower Hutt, New Zealand) for advice on the management and interpretation of Earthquake Commission data; Statistics NZ, Sheree Gibbs, June Atkinson, and the Virtual Health Information Network for assistance with the use of the IDI; and Ichiro Kawachi for comments on the final draft of this manuscript.