Journal article

Higher CO2 concentrations increase extreme event risk in a 1.5 degrees C world

Hugh S Baker, Richard J Millar, David J Karoly, Urs Beyerle, Benoit P Guillod, Dann Mitchell, Hideo Shiogama, Sarah Sparrow, Tim Woollings, Myles R Allen

Nature Climate Change | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2018

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Natural Environment Research Council


Awarded by Environmental Restoration and Conservation Agency, Japan


Awarded by Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy


Funding Acknowledgements

H.S.B. is supported by Natural Environment Research Council grant NE/L002612/1. R.J.M. was supported by Natural Environment Research Council grant NE/P014844/1. D.M. is supported by a NERC independent fellowship. H.S. was supported by the Integrated Research Program for Advancing Climate Models (TOUGOU program) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan and ERTDF 2-1702 of Environmental Restoration and Conservation Agency, Japan. The authors thank the HAPPI project team and the modelling centres who contributed simulations. This research used science gateway resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The authors are grateful to F. Otto for making available results from event attribution experiments that provided the original motivation for this study. We would like to thank our colleagues at the Oxford eResearch Centre: A. Bowery, M. Rashid, P. Uhe and D. Wallom for their technical expertise. We would like to thank the Met Office Hadley Centre PRECIS team for their technical and scientific support for the development and application of weather@Home. Finally, we would like to thank all of the volunteers who have donated their computing time to climateprediction.net and weather@home.