Journal article

Navigation of brain networks

Caio Seguin, Martijn P van den Heuvel, Andrew Zalesky

PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA | NATL ACAD SCIENCES | Published : 2018

Abstract

Understanding the mechanisms of neural communication in large-scale brain networks remains a major goal in neuroscience. We investigated whether navigation is a parsimonious routing model for connectomics. Navigating a network involves progressing to the next node that is closest in distance to a desired destination. We developed a measure to quantify navigation efficiency and found that connectomes in a range of mammalian species (human, mouse, and macaque) can be successfully navigated with near-optimal efficiency (>80% of optimal efficiency for typical connection densities). Rewiring network topology or repositioning network nodes resulted in 45-60% reductions in navigation performance. W..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by Human Connectome Project, WU-Minn Consortium


Awarded by ALW (Earth and Life Sciences) open


Awarded by VIDI grant from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH


Awarded by MQ: Transforming Mental Health


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank Mikail Rubinov for providing connectivity data for the mouse. Human data were provided by the Human Connectome Project, WU-Minn Consortium (1U54MH091657; Principal Investigators David Van Essen and Kamil Ugurbil) funded by the 16 National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and centers that support the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, and by the McDonnell Center for Systems Neuroscience at Washington University. C.S. is funded by a Melbourne Research Scholarship. M.P.v.d.H. was funded by an ALW (Earth and Life Sciences) open (ALWOP.179) and VIDI (452-16-015) grant from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) and a Fellowship of MQ. A.Z. is supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Senior Research Fellowship B (1136649).