Journal article

Environmental grass pollen levels in utero and at birth and cord blood IgE: Analysis of three birth cohorts

Nugroho Harry Susanto, Ann-Marie Malby Schoos, Marie Standl, Adrian J Lowe, Shyamali C Dharmage, Cecilie Svanes, Agus Salim, Andrea von Berg, Irina Lehmann, Morten Arendt Rasmussen, Matthias Werchan, Karl-Christian Bergmann, Caroline Lodge, Michael J Abramson, Joachim Heinrich, Hans Bisgaard, Bircan Erbas

ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL | PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2018

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Early life factors are associated with allergic respiratory diseases, but the role of high grass pollen concentrations during pregnancy and shortly after birth is not known. OBJECTIVE: To assess outdoor levels of grass pollen during the intrauterine period and at birth during peak pollen season on cord blood IgE in birth cohorts. METHODS: Three birth cohorts were included: MACS (n = 429), Australia; COPSAC2000 (n = 200), Denmark; and LISA (n = 1968), Germany. Cord blood IgE was categorized (1 kU/L) and dichotomized (high IgE ≥ 0.5 kU/L). Birth during the grass pollen season months and cumulative exposure to outdoor grass pollen counts during pregnancy with cord blood IgE were ana..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Lundbeck Foundation


Awarded by Ministry of Health


Awarded by Danish Council for Strategic Research


Awarded by Federal Ministry for Environment (IUF Dusseldorf)


Awarded by 7th Framework Program: MeDALL project (MeDALL project)


Funding Acknowledgements

The first 6 years of the MACS was funded (study formula and staff) by Nestec Ltd., a subsidiary of Nestle Australia. The 12-year follow-up was funded by a project grant from the Asthma Foundation of Victoria. The National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia funded the 18-year (APP454856), and current 25-year (APP1079668) follow-up study. All bodies that have funded aspects of the MACS have had no role in interpretation or publication of study findings.All funding received by COPSAC is listed on www.copsac.com. The Lundbeck Foundation (Grant no R16-A1694); The Ministry of Health (Grant no 903516); Danish Council for Strategic Research (Grant no 0603-00280B) and The Capital Region Research Foundation have provided core support to the COPSAC research center.The LISA study was mainly supported by grants from the Federal Ministry for Education, Science, Research and Technology and in addition from Helmholtz Zentrum Munich (former GSF), Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Leipzig, Research Institute at Marien-Hospital Wesel, Pediatric Practice, Bad Honnef for the first 2 years. The 4 year, 6 year, 10 year and 15 year follow-up examinations of the LISA study were covered from the respective budgets of the involved partners (Helmholtz Zentrum Munich (former GSF), Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Leipzig, Research Institute at Marien-Hospital Wesel, Pediatric Practice, Bad Honnef, IUF - Leibniz-Research Institute for Environmental Medicine at the University of Dusseldorf) and in addition by a grant from the Federal Ministry for Environment (IUF Dusseldorf 20462296). Further, the 15 year follow-up examination of the LISA study was supported by the Commission of the European Communities, the 7th Framework Program: MeDALL project (MeDALL project 261357).N.H.S. is supported by La Trobe University Postgraduate Research Scholarship (LTUPRS) and La Trobe University Full Fee Research Scholarship (LTUFFRS) from La Trobe University.