Journal article

Cloud, precipitation and radiation responses to large perturbations in global dimethyl sulfide

Sonya L Fiddes, Matthew T Woodhouse, Zebedee Nicholls, Todd P Lane, Robyn Schofield

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics | Copernicus Publications | Published : 2018

Abstract

Natural aerosol emission represents one of the largest uncertainties in our understanding of the radiation budget. Sulfur emitted by marine organisms, as dimethyl sulfide (DMS), constitutes one-fifth of the global sulfur budget and yet the distribution, fluxes and fate of DMS remain poorly constrained. This study evaluates the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS) United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosol (UKCA) model in terms of cloud fraction, radiation and precipitation, and then quantifies the role of DMS in the chemistry–climate system. We find that ACCESS-UKCA has similar cloud and radiation biases to other global climate models. By removing all DMS, or alternativ..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes


Awarded by ARC Discovery Project: Great Barrier Reef as a significant source of climatically relevant aerosol particles


Awarded by Australian government


Funding Acknowledgements

Sonya L. Fiddes would like to thank Peter J. Rayner and his research group for their helpful discussions. Sonya L. Fiddes and Robyn Schofield are supported by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science (CE110001028). Todd P. Lane is supported by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CE170100023). Sonya L. Fiddes and Robyn Schofield were supported by the ARC Discovery Project: Great Barrier Reef as a significant source of climatically relevant aerosol particles (DP150101649). Matthew T. Woodhouse is supported by the Earth System and Climate Change Hub of the Australian Government's National Environmental Science Programme (NESP). This research was undertaken with the assistance of resources and services from the National Computational Infrastructure (Project q90), which is supported by the Australian government. Sonya L. Fiddes and Zebedee Nicholls are supported by the Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship.