Journal article

Analysis of the Influence of microRNAs in Lithium Response in Bipolar Disorder

Celine S Reinbold, Andreas J Forstner, Julian Hecker, Janice M Fullerton, Per Hoffmann, Liping Hou, Urs Heilbronner, Franziska Degenhardt, Mazda Adli, Kazufumi Akiyama, Nirmala Akula, Raffaella Ardau, Barbara Arias, Lena Backlund, Antonio Benabarre, Susanne Bengesser, Abesh K Bhattacharjee, Joanna M Biernacka, Armin Birner, Cynthia Marie-Claire Show all

FRONTIERS IN PSYCHIATRY | FRONTIERS MEDIA SA | Published : 2018

Abstract

Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common, highly heritable neuropsychiatric disease characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. Lithium is the best-established long-term treatment for BD, even though individual response is highly variable. Evidence suggests that some of this variability has a genetic basis. This is supported by the largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) of lithium response to date conducted by the International Consortium on Lithium Genetics (ConLiGen). Recently, we performed the first genome-wide analysis of the involvement of miRNAs in BD and identified nine BD-associated miRNAs. However, it is unknown whether these miRNAs are also associated with lithium r..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) through the Integrated Network IntegraMent (Integrated Understanding of Causes and Mechanisms in Mental Disorders) under the e:Med Programme


Awarded by German Research Foundation (DFG)


Awarded by Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF)


Awarded by Swiss National Foundation


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH


Awarded by MRC


Funding Acknowledgements

The study was supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) through the Integrated Network IntegraMent (Integrated Understanding of Causes and Mechanisms in Mental Disorders), under the auspices of the e:Med Programme (grant 01ZX1314A/01ZX1614A to MN and SC, grant 01ZX1314G/01ZX1614G to MR). The study was also supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG; grant FOR2107; RI908/11-1 to MR; NO246/10-1 toMN), and the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF, grant 310030_156791 to SC). MMN is a member of the DFG-funded Excellence-Cluster ImmunoSensation. AF received support from the BONFOR program of the Medical Faculty of the University of Bonn. The collection of the Geneva sample was supported by the Swiss National Foundation (grants Synapsy 51NF40-158776 and 32003B-125469). The Australian sample contribution was supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (grants 1037196, 1063960) and the Janette Mary O'Neil Research Fellowship to JF.