Journal article

High mammographic density in women is associated with protumor inflammation

Cecilia W Huo, Prue Hill, Grace Chew, Paul J Neeson, Heloise Halse, Elizabeth D Williams, Michael A Henderson, Erik W Thompson, Kara L Britt

BREAST CANCER RESEARCH | BMC | Published : 2018

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that increased mammographic density (MD) is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. We previously observed an elevated number of vimentin+/CD45+ leukocytes in high MD (HMD) epithelium. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the subtypes of immune cell infiltrates in HMD and low MD (LMD) breast tissue. METHODS: Fifty-four women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre or St. Vincent's Hospital were enrolled. Upon completion of mastectomy, HMD and LMD areas were resected under radiological guidance in collaboration with BreastScreen Victoria and were subsequently fixed, processed, and sectioned. Fifte..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by NBCF through a National Collaborative Research Network


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by the Victorian Breast Cancer Research Consortium, the St. Vincent's Hospital (Melbourne) Research Endowment Fund, the National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF), the University of Melbourne Research Grant Support Scheme (MRGSS), and the Princess Alexandra Hospital Foundation. CWH was supported by the Australian Postgraduate Awards scholarship. KB was supported by an NBCF Early Career Fellowship. EDW was supported by funding from the Australian Government Department of Health and the Movember Foundation and Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia through a Movember Revolutionary Team Award. EWT was supported in part by the NBCF through a National Collaborative Research Network award (CG-10-04). This study benefited from support provided by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program to St. Vincent's Institute and to the Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute. The Translational Research Institute is supported by a grant from the Australian Government.