Journal article

A brief survey to identify pregnant women experiencing increased psychosocial and socioeconomic risk

Anna Price, Hannah Bryson, Fiona Mensah, Lynn Kemp, Charlene Smith, Francesca Orsini, Harriet Hiscock, Lisa Gold, Ashlee Smith, Lara Bishop, Sharon Goldfeld

WOMEN AND BIRTH | ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV | Published : 2019

Abstract

PROBLEM: Identifying pregnant women whose children are at risk of poorer development in a rapid, acceptable and feasible way. BACKGROUND: A range of antenatal psychosocial and socioeconomic risk factors adversely impact children's health, behaviour and cognition. AIM: Investigate whether a brief, waiting room survey of risk factors identifies women experiencing increased antenatal psychosocial and socioeconomic risk when asked in a private, in-home interview. METHODS: Brief 10-item survey (including age, social support, health, smoking, stress/anxious mood, education, household income, employment) collected from pregnant women attending 10 Australian public birthing hospitals, used to determ..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

This work is supported by the Victorian Department of Education and Training, the Tasmanian Department of Health and Human Services, the Ian Potter Foundation, Sabemo Trust, Sidney Myer fund, the Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation, and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC, 1079418). The MCRI administered the research grant for the study and provided infrastructural support to its staff but played no role in the conduct or analysis of the trial. Research at the MCRI is supported by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program. SG was supported by an NHMRC Career Development Award (1082922). FM was supported by NHMRC Early Career and Career Development Fellowships (1037449, 1111160). HH was supported by an NHMRC Career Development Award (607351). LG was supported by a NHMRC Early Career Fellowship (1035100). The funding bodies had no role in relation to the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.