Journal article

Circulating epinephrine is not required for chronic stress to enhance metastasis

Adam K Walker, Davide Martelli, Alexandra I Ziegler, Gavin W Lambert, Sarah E Phillips, Stephen J Hill, Robin M McAllen, Erica K Sloan

PSYCHONEUROENDOCRINOLOGY | PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2019

Abstract

Signaling through β-adrenergic receptors drives cancer progression and β-blockers are being evaluated as a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent metastasis. Orthotopic mouse models of breast cancer show that β-adrenergic signaling induced by chronic stress accelerates metastasis, and that β2-adrenergic receptors on tumor cells are critical for this. Endogenous catecholamines are released during chronic stress: norepinephrine from the adrenal medulla and sympathetic nerves, and epinephrine from the adrenal medulla. β2-adrenergic receptors are much more sensitive to epinephrine than to norepinephrine. To determine if epinephrine is necessary in the effects of stress on cancer progression, we u..

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Grants

Awarded by National Breast Cancer Foundation Australia postdoctoral fellowship


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by a National Breast Cancer Foundation Australia postdoctoral fellowship (PF-15-014) and a Monash Interdisciplinary Research Scheme Award to AKW; the David and Lorelle Skewes Foundation, the Peter Mac Foundation, and the National Health and Medical Research Council (APP1147498, APP1098887). GL was supported by a Senior Research Fellowship from the NHMRC (APP1042492). This work was supported by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program.