Journal article

Two subspecies of bent-winged bats (Miniopterus orianae bassanii and oceanensis) in southern Australia have diverse fungal skin flora but not Pseudogymnoascus destructans

Peter H Holz, Linda F Lumsden, Marc S Marenda, Glenn F Browning, Jasmin Hufschmid

PLOS ONE | PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE | Published : 2018

Abstract

Fungi are increasingly being documented as causing disease in a wide range of faunal species, including Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the fungus responsible for white nose syndrome which is having a devastating impact on bats in North America. The population size of the Australian southern bent-winged bat (Miniopterus orianae bassanii), a critically endangered subspecies, has declined over the past 50 years. As part of a larger study to determine whether disease could be a contributing factor to this decline, southern bent-winged bats were tested for the presence of a range of potentially pathogenic fungi: P. destructans, dermatophytes and Histoplasma capsulatum (a potential human pathogen c..

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Grants

Awarded by Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment


Funding Acknowledgements

Funded by Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment, HOLSW2016-R1-F109, https://www.ecolsoc.org.au/awards-and-prizes/holsworth-wildlife-research-endowment (PH), Wildlife Disease Association Australasia, http://www.wildlifedisease.org/wda/SECTIONS/Australasian.aspx (PH), Australian Government's Threatened Species Discretionary Grants Program, Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning Victoria, http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/threatened-species-recovery-fund (LL), Karst Conservation Fund, http://www.caves.org.au/conservation/karst-conservation-fund (PH), David Middleton (PH), Australian Postgraduate Award Scholarship, https://studenteforms.app.unimelb.edu.au/apex/f?p=153:2:0:::2:P2_ID:50 (PH). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.The authors would like to thank the Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment, the Wildlife Disease Association Australasia, the Karst Conservation Fund, the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning, and David Middleton for providing generous financial support for this project. The lead author was supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award scholarship. The authors acknowledge use of the services and facilities of AGRF. The authors acknowledge the valuable assistance provided by David Blehert, Andrew Borman, Amanda Bush, Rhys Bushell, Alejandra Calderon, Anthony Chamings, Yvonne Ingeme, Sarah Kidd, Barbara Konsak-Ilievski, Alistair Legione, David McLelland, Carol Meteyer, Tony Mitchell, Penelope Steer-Cope, Emmi van Harten, Reto Zollinger and the numerous other volunteers involved with the bat trapping and sampling trips.