Journal article

Reconfigured Cyanogenic Glucoside Biosynthesis in Eucalyptus cladocalyx Involves a Cytochrome P450 CYP706C55

Cecilie Cetti Hansen, Mette Sorensen, Thiago AM Veiga, Julian FS Zibrandtsen, Allison M Heskes, Carl Erik Olsen, Berin A Boughton, Birger Lindberg Moller, Elizabeth HJ Neilsono

Plant Physiology | AMER SOC PLANT BIOLOGISTS | Published : 2018

Abstract

Cyanogenic glucosides are a class of specialized metabolites widespread in the plant kingdom. Cyanogenic glucosides are α-hydroxynitriles, and their hydrolysis releases toxic hydrogen cyanide, providing an effective chemical defense against herbivores. Eucalyptus cladocalyx is a cyanogenic tree, allocating up to 20% of leaf nitrogen to the biosynthesis of the cyanogenic monoglucoside, prunasin. Here, mass spectrometry analyses of E. cladocalyx tissues revealed spatial and ontogenetic variations in prunasin content, as well as the presence of the cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin in flower buds and flowers. The identification and biochemical characterization of the prunasin biosynthetic enzyme..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by "VILLUM Research Center for Plant Plasticity"


Awarded by ERC Advanced Grant


Awarded by Young Investigator Program fellowship from the VILLUM Foundation


Awarded by Carlsberg Foundation


Awarded by Danish Independent Research Council Sapere Aude Research Talent Post Doctoral Stipend


Awarded by Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo


Awarded by Marie Sklodowska Curie Individual Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the "VILLUM Research Center for Plant Plasticity" (Project No. 7523), by the UCPH Excellence Program for Interdisciplinary Research to Center for Synthetic Biology, and by an ERC Advanced Grant (ERC-2012-ADG_20120314, Project No. 323034) to B.L.M. E.H.J.N. was supported by a Young Investigator Program fellowship from the VILLUM Foundation (Project No. 13167), a grant from the Carlsberg Foundation (Grant No. 2013_01_0908), and by a Danish Independent Research Council Sapere Aude Research Talent Post Doctoral Stipend (Grant No. 6111-00379B). T.A.M.V. was supported by a visiting professor fellowship from the Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo (#FAPESP BPE 2014/11811-2). A.M.H. was supported by a Marie Sklodowska Curie Individual Fellowship (Project No. 658677). Mass spectrometry imaging was conducted at Metabolomics Australia located at the School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Australia, which is an NCRIS initiative under Bioplatforms Australia Pty Ltd.