Journal article

Living well after breast cancer randomized controlled trial protocol: evaluating a telephone-delivered weight loss intervention versus usual care in women following treatment for breast cancer

Marina M Reeves, Caroline O Terranova, Jane M Erickson, Jennifer R Job, Denise SK Brookes, Nicole McCarthy, Ingrid J Hickman, Sheleigh P Lawler, Brianna S Fjeldsoe, Genevieve N Healy, Elisabeth AH Winkler, Monika Janda, J Lennert Veerman, Robert S Ware, Johannes B Prins, Theo Vos, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Elizabeth G Eakin

BMC CANCER | BMC | Published : 2016

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Obesity, physical inactivity and poor diet quality have been associated with increased risk of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality as well as treatment-related side-effects in breast cancer survivors. Weight loss intervention trials in breast cancer survivors have shown that weight loss is safe and achievable; however, few studies have examined the benefits of such interventions on a broad range of outcomes and few have examined factors important to translation (e.g. feasible delivery method for scaling up, assessment of sustained changes, cost-effectiveness). The Living Well after Breast Cancer randomized controlled trial aims to evaluate a 12-month telephone-delivere..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by National Breast Cancer Foundation


Awarded by NHMRC Career Development Fellowships


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship in Population Health


Awarded by NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence Grant


Funding Acknowledgements

This study is funded by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Project Grant (GNT1024739). Reeves is funded by a National Breast Cancer Foundation research fellowship (ECF-13-09). Terranova is funded by a postgraduate scholarship from The University of Queensland. Healy and Janda are funded by NHMRC Career Development Fellowships (GNT108029 and GNT1045247). Eakin is funded by an NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship in Population Health (GNT1041789). Winkler is supported by a NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence Grant (GNT1057608). The funders had no role in the design of the study, collection, analysis or interpretation of the data, or preparation of the manuscript.