Journal article

What strategies do desk-based workers choose to reduce sitting time and how well do they work? Findings from a cluster randomised controlled trial

Samantha K Stephens, Elizabeth G Eakin, Bronwyn K Clark, Elisabeth AH Winkler, Neville Owen, Anthony D LaMontagne, Marj Moodie, Sheleigh P Lawler, David W Dunstan, Genevieve N Healy

International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity | BMC | Published : 2018

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Large amounts of sitting at work have been identified as an emerging occupational health risk, and findings from intervention trials have been reported. However, few such reports have examined participant-selected strategies and their relationships with behaviour change. METHODS: The Stand Up Victoria cluster-randomised controlled trial was a workplace-delivered intervention comprising organisational, environmental and individual level behaviour change strategies aimed at reducing sitting time in desk-based workers. Sit-stand workstations were provided, and participants (n = 134; intervention group only) were guided by health coaches to identify strategies for the 'Stand Up', 'Si..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence Grant on Sitting time and Chronic Disease Prevention - Measurement, Mechanisms and Interventions


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Victorian Health Promotion Foundation


Awarded by NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence grant on Obesity Policy and Food Systems


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was funded by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) project grant [#1002706], project funding from the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation's Creating Healthy Workplaces program and, by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program.Stephens was supported by an Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship and a top up scholarship from an NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence Grant on Sitting time and Chronic Disease Prevention - Measurement, Mechanisms and Interventions (#1057608) on which Owen, Dunstan, Eakin and Healy are Chief Investigators. Eakin was supported by an NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship (#511001). Clark was supported by an NHMRC Early Career Fellowship (#107168). Winkler was supported by an NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence Grant on Sitting Time and Chronic Disease Prevention - Measurement, Mechanisms and Interventions (#1057608) on which Owen, Dunstan, Eakin and Healy are Chief Investigators. Owen was supported by an NHMRC Program Grant (#569940), an NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship (#1003960); and, by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program. LaMontagne was supported by Centre grant funding from the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation (#2010-0509). Moodie was supported by an NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence grant on Obesity Policy and Food Systems (#1041020). Dunstan was supported by an NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship (#1078360) and the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program. Healy was supported by an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (#1086029). None of the funders had involvement in the design of the study, data collection, data analysis, data interpretation, or writing of the manuscript.