Journal article

Brief intervention on Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol and Physical (SNAP) inactivity for smoking relapse prevention after release from smoke-free prisons: a study protocol for a multicentre, investigator-blinded, randomised controlled trial

Xingzhong Jin, Stuart A Kinner, Robyn Hopkins, Emily Stockings, Ryan J Courtney, Anthony Shakeshaft, Dennis Petrie, Timothy Dobbins, Kate Dolan

BMJ Open | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2018

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Smoking remains the leading risk factor for disease burden and mortality worldwide. Heavy Smoking is often associated with poor Nutrition, Alcohol abuse and Physical inactivity (known as 'SNAP'). Australia's first prison smoking ban was introduced in the Northern Territory in July 2013. However, relapse to smoking after release from prison is normative. Holistic and cost-effective interventions are needed to maintain post-release abstinence to realise the potential public health impact of smoke-free prison policies. Rigorous, large-scale trials of innovative and scalable interventions are crucial to inform tobacco control policies in correctional settings. METHODS AND ANALYSIS:..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Commonwealth Government Department of Health Tackling Indigenous Smoking Grant


Funding Acknowledgements

The SNAP study is supported by the Australian Commonwealth Government Department of Health Tackling Indigenous Smoking Grant (TIS H151G6012). The design, management, analysis and reporting of the study are entirely independent of the funding body. The National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), Australia, is supported by funding from the Australian Government under the Substance Misuse Prevention and Service Improvements Grants Fund and by infrastructure support from the UNSW, Australia.