Journal article

Drug Resistance and Coreceptor Usage in HIV Type 1 Subtype C-Infected Children Initiating or Failing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

Taryn N Green, Mohendran Archary, Michelle L Gordon, Nagavelli Padayachi, Yolanda Lie, Elizabeth D Anton, Jacqueline D Reeves, Anneke Grobler, Raziya Bobat, Hoosen Coovadia, Thumbi Ndung'u

AIDS RESEARCH AND HUMAN RETROVIRUSES | MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC | Published : 2012

Abstract

HIV-1 drug resistance monitoring in resource-poor settings is crucial due to limited drug alternatives. Recent reports of the increased prevalence of CXCR4 usage in subtype C infections may have implications for CCR5 antagonists in therapy. We investigated the prevalence of drug resistance mutations and CXCR4 coreceptor utilization of viruses from HIV-1 subtype C-infected children. Fifty-one children with virological failure during highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and 43 HAART-naive children were recruited. Drug resistance genotyping and coreceptor utilization assessment by phenotypic and genotypic methods were performed. At least one significant drug resistance mutation was pres..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)


Awarded by National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)


Awarded by Statistical and Data Analysis Center at Harvard School of Public Health under the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases


Awarded by NIH


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

Overall support for the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials Group (IMPAACT) was provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) [U01 AI068632], the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) [AI068632]. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH. This work was supported by the Statistical and Data Analysis Center at Harvard School of Public Health under the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases cooperative agreement #5 U01 AI41110 with the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group (PACTG) and #1 U01 AI068616 with the IMPAACT Group. Support of the sites was provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the NICHD International and Domestic Pediatric and Maternal HIV Clinical Trials Network funded by NICHD (contract number N01-DK-9-001/HHSN267200 800001C).Further support was received from the Hasso Plattner Foundation, the South African DST/NRF Research Chair Initiative, and by NIH Grant 5R44AT057068 to Monogram Biosciences.