Journal article

Central relaxin-3 receptor (RXFP3) activation impairs social recognition and modulates ERK-phosphorylation in specific GABAergic amygdala neurons

Hector Albert-Gasco, Sandra Sanchez-Sarasua, Sherie Ma, Cristina Garcia-Diaz, Andrew L Gundlach, Ana M Sanchez-Perez, Francisco E Olucha-Bordonau

BRAIN STRUCTURE & FUNCTION | SPRINGER HEIDELBERG | Published : 2019

Abstract

In mammals, the extended amygdala is a neural hub for social and emotional information processing. In the rat, the extended amygdala receives inhibitory GABAergic projections from the nucleus incertus (NI) in the pontine tegmentum. NI neurons produce the neuropeptide relaxin-3, which acts via the Gi/o-protein-coupled receptor, RXFP3. A putative role for RXFP3 signalling in regulating social interaction was investigated by assessing the effect of intracerebroventricular infusion of the RXFP3 agonist, RXFP3-A2, on performance in the 3-chamber social interaction paradigm. Central RXFP3-A2, but not vehicle, infusion, disrupted the capacity to discriminate between a familiar and novel conspecific..

View full abstract

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Universitat Jaume I


Awarded by Program of Mobilities of the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion y Cultura


Awarded by Universitat Jaume I FPI-UJI Predoctoral Research Scholarship


Awarded by Plan Propi Universitat Jaume I


Awarded by NHMRC (Australia)



Funding Acknowledgements

The authors thank Dr. Mohammad Akhter Hossain (The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville, Australia) for providing the RXFP3-A2 peptide used in these studies. This research was supported by the following grants: Universitat Jaume I research grant UJI-B2016-40 and Program of Mobilities of the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion y Cultura, PRX17/00646 (FEO-B); Universitat Jaume I FPI-UJI Predoctoral Research Scholarship PREDOC/2014/35 (HAG); E-2016-43 Research Travel Grant (HAG); Plan Propi Universitat Jaume I P1.1A2014-06 (AMS-P); NHMRC (Australia) Project Grant 1067522 (ALG); and Dorothy Levien Foundation research grant (ALG).